An appeal to raise funds for the urgent

repair of the church tower and roof

Welcome Built in 1710 or earlier, St Andrews Church stands on a sandstone bluff overlooking the confluence of the River Worfe and Wesley Brook, and within a ‘golden’ half square mile of geography that has defined Ryton’s history and heritage. Within that area has stood a medieval motte and bailey, important seventeenth century industry in the form of water, paper, and slitting mills and, more latterly, the Church. The motte and bailey, and the industry, have long since gone, leaving the Church as the sole surviving reminder of the once significant importance of the Parish of Ryton and Grindle to this part of Shropshire. Now the church is in desperate need of repair and without those repairs this historic building, which is steeped in so much local history, is in danger of having to be closed.
A charity registered in England & Wales no. 1149410 for the restoration of Saint Andrews Church Ryton & Grindle as a historic, public and usable building for the benefit of the wider community.
FOSACRAG
Site designed and created by Design IT
Copyright © FOSACRAG 2017
St Andrews Church
Friends of St Andrews Church Ryton & Grindle Wood panel Light through stained glass window Stained glass window
Site designed and created by Design IT
Copyright © FOSACRAG 2017
St Andrews Church
Friends of St Andrews Church Ryton & Grindle
A charity registered in England & Wales no. 1149410 for the restoration of Saint Andrews Church Ryton & Grindle as a historic, public and usable building for the benefit of the wider community.
Wood panel
FOSACRAG

An appeal to raise funds

for the urgent repair of

the church tower and

roof

Welcome Built in 1710 or earlier, St Andrews Church stands on a sandstone bluff overlooking the confluence of the River Worfe and Wesley Brook, and within a ‘golden’ half square mile of geography that has defined Ryton’s history and heritage. Within that area has stood a medieval motte and bailey, important seventeenth century industry in the form of water, paper, and slitting mills and, more latterly, the Church. The motte and bailey, and the industry, have long since gone, leaving the Church as the sole surviving reminder of the once significant importance of the Parish of Ryton and Grindle to this part of Shropshire. Now the church is in desperate need of repair and without those repairs this historic building, which is steeped in so much local history, is in danger of having to be closed.
Stained glass window